Price & Value

Why price and value must co-exist…

The most important thing in pricing is value. This is not the value as you determine it, or but rather the value as perceived by the customer.  The price a customer is willing to pay, and therefore the price you can achieve, is always a reflection of the perceived value of the product or service in the customer’s eyes.

There is a relationship between price and value which the Romans understood; in Latin the word “pretium” means both price and value. Literally speaking, price and value are one and the same. This is a good guideline for businesses to follow when they make their price decisions in that you need to:

  • Create value: how your product or service is designed, made and performs all drive the value that customers perceive. Innovation also plays an important role as it focuses on creating, unlocking or delivering customer value that was not previously available to them before.
  • Communicate value: This is how you influence your customers’ perception. It includes how you describe the product, your value proposition, and your brand. Value communication also covers packaging, product performance, and shelf or online placement.
  • Retain value: Your customers’ expectations as to how the value will last post-purchase will have a significant influence on a customer’s willingness to pay, for example, luxury goods, consumer durables and cars.

There are a couple of illustrative quotes regarding price and value. Firstly, the French have a saying, “le prix s’oublie, la qualité reste.” Loosely translated, that means that the quality you bought endures long after you have forgotten the price.

“That is the worst and yet easiest error. Better be cheated in the price than in the quality of goods.” (Baltasar Gracian, 1601-1658)

The point here is that price is quickly forgotten, while quality, good or bad, stays with us. So when you create a product or service is when you begin your planning on how and what to price it as. Make sure you create, communicate and retain value which is perceived by customer as valuable to encourage their willingness to pay.

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Share your thoughts and ideas here, or email me at andrew.cooke@business-gps.com.au

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Lessons from Disneyland

Build your map and build value

Have you ever been to Disneyland?  Millions of people, children and adults alike, have visited it and enjoyed its magic and experienced the wonder it has engendered. But did you know it nearly didn’t happen?

When Walt Disney first tried to get financial backing for his project – the future Disneyland – his own studio refused to fund it. So what did Walt Disney do?

He sent his brother, Ray, to meet with potential investors in New York. Imagine going to meet with potential investors to sell the concept of Disneyland – a concept that was new, unknown and untested. However, Walt Disney did not send his brother unarmed or empty-handed – he equipped him with a map of what Disneyland would look like.

Figure 1 – The Original Map for Disneyland

The map of Disneyland allowed Walt and Ray Disney to share the vision with their potential investors, it made the idea tangible for them, and provided them with a path that they could follow to see where this concept would lead it to.

Maps provide a point of reference for you and others, a guide to how you will achieve your vision, and a way by which people can align their interests and effort by creating buy-in and engagement. They reduce risk and provide a yardstick that you can measure your progress against.

What is the map that you have drawn, or have to draw, that you need to share with your stakeholders – your staff, your customers, your suppliers, your investors and shareholders, and your community. And when you have your map – how will you share it and communicate so it aligns their needs, interests and actions with those that you need?

The first map illustrating the Disneyland concept recently sold for over USD $1 million at auction. What will your map be worth to you in the future?

 

To view or download a PDF version of this blog click here

Share your thoughts and ideas here, or email me at andrew.cooke@business-gps.com.au

If you found this article of use or interest please don’t hesitate to share it with others.

Click here to find out more about Andrew Cooke and Growth & Profit Solutions